Rome

Fri 21 Apr 2017 / Source: Vatican Radio

Abp Auza speaks at International Dialogue on Migration
Archbishop Bernardito Auza, the Apostolic Nuncio and Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, has given statements at two panels during the International Dialogue on Migration (IDM). The IDM is the International Organization for Migration’s principal forum for migration policy dialogue.

 

Addressing a panel on “Implementing the SDGs [sustainable development goals] and Other Major Frameworks,” Abp Auza said, “At the heart of forced migration is lack of solidarity and often wilful neglect of our neighbors’ most basic needs, such as access to quality education, decent work, adequate housing and primary health-care.” For this reason, he said, “our first and most basic work must be to answer the basic needs of our brothers and sisters and to ensure their peace and security at home. This is also the fundamental purpose of the Goals we set out for ourselves in the 2030 Agenda.”

At a second panel focussed on “Reaching a whole government approach to Migration,” Abp Auza said, “The governance of migration cannot be relegated to one ministry or a single department in government.” Rather, “a comprehensive response to migration requires a ‘whole of government approach,’ one that integrates the perspectives of different ministries and officials, that reflects the integral nature of the human person and that acknowledges the need for a common response to migration in all of its complexity.”

Pointing out Pope Francis’ emphasis on defending the “inalienable rights” of migrants, Abp Auza noted that the Holy Father has introduced the concept of the “duty of civility.” This concept, he said, “not only implies government efforts but also the obligation of migrants, while they continue to treasure their own values from their culture of origin, to respect the laws and traditions of the countries in which they are received and embraced.”

 

Below, the full text of both of Archbishop Bernardito Auza’s statements:  

 

Panel 1: Implementing the SDGs and Other Major Frameworks:
How the Global Compact on Migration can help meet our commitments

New York, 18 April 2017

Mr. Chair, Distinguished Panellists,

The Global Compact on Migration will provide the international community with an opportunity to achieve the commitments it made in the adoption of the 2030 Agenda. During his address to the UN General Assembly, on 25 September 2015, Pope Francis described the adoption of the “2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” as “an important sign of hope”. 

Taking into consideration the 2016 Note from the Holy See with regard to the same Agenda, the Holy See believes that this hope will be realized only if the Agenda is truly, fairly, and effectively implemented for all, including for migrants. In the Agenda itself, Target 10.7 calls for the facilitation of “orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.” Such an outcome requires, however, the analysis, delineation and effective realization of practical strategies to address the drivers of forced migration, like those proposed in the Agenda.

For this reason, Pope Francis has urged all government leaders to take immediate, effective, practical and concrete steps to preserve and improve the natural environment and thus put an end as quickly as possible to the phenomenon of social and economic exclusion.

Mr Chair,

At the heart of forced migration is lack of solidarity and often wilful neglect of our neighbours’ most basic needs, such as access to quality education, decent work, adequate housing and primary health-care. These unmet needs are at the root of global instability and their baneful repercussions are human trafficking, the marketing of human organs and tissues, the sexual exploitation of boys and girls, slave labour, including prostitution, the drug and weapons trade, terrorism and international organized crime. This is why our first and most basic work must be to answer the basic needs of our brothers and sisters and to ensure their peace and security at home. This is also the fundamental purpose of the Goals we set out for ourselves in the 2030 Agenda. One additional area of grave concern requiring attentive consideration during this dialogue’s deliberations is that of the significant numbers of unaccompanied or separated child migrants. My delegation would like to echo the recent words of Pope Francis and make a heartfelt appeal that long-term, concrete solutions to this problem be incorporated into the Compact and adopted. Even before addressing solutions, such as family reunification, the question of child migrants must be tackled at its source.  This requires, as a first step, the commitment of the whole international community to eliminate the conflicts and violence that force people to flee or to send their children ahead with the hope that they will find safety, security and ultimately a better life. Far-sighted perspectives are called for, capable of offering adequate programs for areas struck by the worst injustice and instability, so that access to authentic development can be guaranteed for all. This perspective should also inform the programs, services and protections provided to migrants not only during their journey, but also upon their arrival in countries of transit and destination. 

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

 

Panel 3: Reaching a whole government approach to Migration: national and local perspectives

New York, 18 April 2017

Mr. Chair,

The governance of migration cannot be relegated to one ministry or a single department in government. A comprehensive response to migration requires a “whole of government approach,” one that integrates the perspectives of different ministries and officials, that reflects the integral nature of the human person and that acknowledges the need for a common response to migration in all of its complexity. In fact a coordinated effort is needed involving, beyond government, the political community, civil society, international organisations, and religious institutions.  

As Pope Francis has emphasized, “Defending ... [migrants’] inalienable rights, ensuring their fundamental freedoms and respecting their dignity are duties from which no one can be exempted.” Respecting, protecting and promoting the human rights of migrants, no matter their migration status, is “a moral imperative,” he said, that must be translated into national and international juridical instruments and the implementation of just far reaching political choices that prioritize constructive processes over immediate results of consensus . ”

Into this discussion, Mr. Chairman, Pope Francis has introduced a new concept – that of the “duty of civility,” which seems quite relevant to the focus of this panel discussion.  This approach not only implies government efforts but also the obligation of migrants, while they continue to treasure their own values from their culture of origin, to respect the laws and traditions of the countries in which they are received and embraced. .

There is an obvious link between migration and development. The human promotion of migrants and their families should therefore begin at their communities of origin. To this end, efforts must be encouraged to foster international cooperation in transnational developmental programs, free from partisan interests, and involving migrants as active protagonists. A more comprehensive response to the opportunities and challenges of migration is possible if the international community works together and starts from the primary needs of both migrants and receiving countries.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.